• A personal perspective of contract instructing in Ontario

  • Zero-hours contracts and precarious academic work in the UK

  • Organizing against the widening gap in academic job security in Australia

  • From Deference to Defiance: The evolution of Ontario faculty associations

  • The political challenge of academic commitment

  • More Than A Bargaining Unit: York University Faculty Association’s commitment to social unionism

Blog Posts

Congress 2015: Challenges, opportunities for public sector unions facing austerity

Austerity and precarity figured largely on the agenda at the Canadian Association of Work and Labour Studies conference this week at the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences in Ottawa. Conversations about how to define precarious work and its impacts on workers’ lives ran through the sessions. Meanwhile, reflections on how to organize workers in a climate […]

Book Launch: A Penny for Your Thoughts

A new book on the impact of corporatization on Canada’s universities was launched on June 4 in Ottawa by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. In A Penny For Your Thoughts, authors Janice Newson and Claire Polster document how the transformation of postsecondary education over the last 35 years has been driven by corporatization. The […]

Congress 2015: The humanities go deep, while Wente plays in the shallow end

The annual Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences brought academics from across the country together in Ottawa this past week. As if on cue, the Globe and Mail published a column by Margaret Wente that took potshots at humanities and social science scholarship. While there are few in attendance at Congress who take this […]

Editorial Matters: The reality of precarious academic work around the world

On February 25, 2015, many adjunct faculty members in the United States walked out of their classrooms to protest their working conditions. Just days later, contract faculty at York University were out on strike. Across North America, reporters and media outlets began to wake up to a sorry reality: for thousands of professors across North […]

Congress 2015: The Canadian higher education data problem

Every year at the Canadian Society for Studies in Higher Education (CSSHE) meeting, you can count on someone – or a lot of someones – complaining about the state of higher education data in Canada. And with good reason- Canada lags behind its OECD in the amount and quality of higher ed data produced. Researchers […]

View All

Featured Articles

A personal perspective of contract instructing in Ontario

Robinson

Contract faculty work in Ontario is unfair, ineffective, and ready for a shakeup. I am a relative newcomer to contract instructing, having moved to Ontario from Saskatchewan in 2010, for family reasons related to health care for my younger son, who 
is a special-needs child. We moved from Saskatchewan because we were unable to get […]

Zero-hours contracts and precarious academic work in the UK

White

The University and College Union is fighting back against zero-hour contracts that trap thousands in casualized work. “Zero-hours contracts mean that you can’t make plans because you don’t want to be ‘unavailable’ when the call comes in. So in the end you are just hanging on, not being able to plan anything for months on […]

Organizing against the widening gap in academic job security in Australia

Rea

Precarious academic work is an important issue in Australia, and the National Tertiary Education Union is making it a priority. Since the beginning of the 21st century, teaching at Australian universities has become casualized with tens of thousands of academics employed on an hourly basis for just a few hours a week during a teaching period. […]

From Deference to Defiance: The evolution of Ontario faculty associations

Heron

Faculty associations are behaving more and more like unions, transforming labour relations at universities in Ontario. Faculty associations in this part of the world are a little more than six decades old. Yet we know relatively little about where they came from and how they have evolved. As they become ever more important in the […]

The political challenge of academic commitment

Vose

As we approach this year’s federal election, professors and academic librarians have a responsibility to speak out. Academic life and politics don’t always mix. There may be times when we can just keep our heads down, teach our courses, conduct our research, and attend committee meetings with little thought to spare for policy decisions being […]

View All
OCUFA