In This Issue

Massively Open Online Embarassment

Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs) may be the way of the future, but they show every sign of disrupting my intricate bargain with humiliation. For ten years, I’ve managed to contain evidence of my incompetence to the small number of students who had the misfortune of wandering into my lecture hall. But online lectures on […]

Harper’s attack on science: No science, no evidence, no truth, no democracy

Science—and the culture of evidence and inquiry it supports—has a long relationship with democracy. Widely available facts have long served as a check on political power. Attacks on science, and on the ability of scientists to communicate freely, are ultimately attacks on democratic governance. It’s no secret the Harper government has a problem with science. […]

Good government and Statistics Canada: The need for true independence

The cancellation of the long form census in 2010 raised serious questions about the independence of Statistics Canada. Munir A. Sheik, former Chief Statistician of Canada, argues that Statistics Canada needs to be insulated from political interference to ensure good data and good public policy.

The MOOC bubble and the attack on public education

MOOCs are the hot new educational trend, garnering headlines around the world. But the hype conceals a speculative bubble, a gamble where public higher education has everything to lose and business interests have everything to gain.